Archive | General Research

Georgetown study finds that the U.S. is depriving itself of vital foreign talent in the field of artificial intelligence and recommends policy changes to make the country more attractive in the international competition for global AI talent

A report published by the Georgetown Center for Security and Emerging Technology discusses the challenges faced by immigrants with skills in artificial intelligence and related fields seeking to find work in the U.S.  They must contend with limited, costly, and uncertain pathways to temporary or permanent residence, as well as an inhospitable regulatory environment. Unsurprisingly, […]

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The Relative Advantages and Disadvantages of Alternative Immigrant Selection Systems

  The research for this paper was commissioned by the Transatlantic Council for its 2018 meeting in Brussels devoted to the theme of “Building Migration Systems for a New Age of Economic Competitiveness.” The paper explores the implication of the changing world of work for immigrant selection systems, highlighting key challenges such as predicting future […]

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Report from New American Economy finds that the percentage of Fortune 500 companies with immigrant founders has risen to 45 percent — includes a data tool to explore the state-level impact of these “New American” companies

Since 2011, New American Economy (NAE) has been analyzing the list of Fortune 500 companies to identify those companies founded by immigrants or their children. In its 2018 analysis, NAE finds that the percentage of such companies with immigrant founders has risen to 45 percent from 40 percent. Among the new immigrant companies to make […]

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NAE study analyzes the economic contribution of DACA-eligible immigrants and TPS holders and assesses the potential cost to the country of ending these programs

In the face of a pending Supreme Court decision on the DACA program and imperiled protections for hundreds of thousands of TPS holders, this report explores the contributions of these two groups of immigrants to the U.S. economy and the economic cost of losing those contributions. Based on American Community Survey data and other sources […]

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Should the U.S. Move in the Direction of a Point-Based Immigration System?

  This timely paper examines the two models for the administration of employment-stream immigration: demand-driven and point system. In demand-driven systems, immigrants are admitted, subject to government regulation, based on an offer from employers. In a point-based immigration system, governments devise a preference system based on a number of factors, including labor-market needs, education and […]

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IZA study based on the Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs, a new database of 7,400 high-tech firms, shows that immigrant-owned businesses – in 15 of 16 measures – are more innovative than native-owned businesses

Much of the economic literature on immigration assumes that immigrants and native-born people are similar “factors of production” — theoretically interchangeable with one another. This study suggests that immigrants, at least in their entrepreneurial activity, have advantages over natives, rather than being similar to them or disadvantaged in any way.  Using the Annual Survey of […]

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What Are the Main Features and Limitations of the Current Family-Based Immigration System? AILA Paper Gives Some Answers.

  The Trump administration seeks to make drastic cuts to America’s family-based immigration system and uses the pejorative term “chain migration” to refer to the immigration of close family members. This paper by the American  Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) describes the categories of relatives who are eligible to come to the U.S. through the family […]

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